2021 - 2031 Mahere Pae Tawhiti - Long Term Plan Consultation

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Rotorua Lakes Council has now approved the 2021 - 2031 Long-Term Plan.

You can learn more about this HERE.

Rotorua Lakes Council has now approved the 2021 - 2031 Long-Term Plan.

You can learn more about this HERE.

Kua mutu ngā kōrerorero mo te Mahere Pae Tawhiti Consultation on the 2021 – 2031 Long-Term Plan has now closed. Thank you to everyone who took the time to read through the consultation document and provide feedback either online, in person, or in writing. Your feedback will help inform elected members’ decision making about the final Long-Term Plan. All feedback is now being evaluated and reviewed. This will later be made available to the public. The Strategy, Policy & Finance Committee will be deliberating over the Long-Term Plan between 27 - 28 May 2021. The final decision on Long-Term Plan will then be made by Council no later than 24 June 2021. Kei te haere tonu ngā mahi hei oranga mō te hapori!

Long Term Plans can be big and complex.

We get that, and are happy to help by answering any questions. 

Please take a look at our LTP FAQ's here or ask away below!

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    Kia ora, on page 6 of the LTP under Homes and thriving communities - "Our proposed LTP actions give affect to the Homes and Thriving Communities Strategic Framework adopted in September 2020" and • Establish community service hubs at Eastside, Westside and Ngongotahā, with neighbourhood cocreation and investment programmes at each of these locations. What are these service hubs?? Also Eastside and Westside locations already have well established services and community associations within their community that Council have supported strongly over the years -Ngongotaha however has not had this support. Can one assume that Ngongotaha will have adequate support and funding allocated in the next few years to get up to the level other communities have and deliver on their community needs? Ie sports facilities, playground revitalization, youth activities and facilities and support are all key issues in the community. With growth of future housing and connections to Tauranga/Hamilton strong - plans and funding need to ensure Ngongotaha can deal with not only current demand of increased population, infrastructure needs but future proofing - has there been funding and thoughts around this from Council in this LTP?

    Bell Whanau asked 7 months ago

    Great questions!

    The general areas of East, West, Ngongotaha and Inner city were identified in the HTCS for the development of Locality Plans, based on new urban growth areas. One of the key objectives of the strategy is that ‘Homes are part of well-designed, thriving and connected communities for the future’. Each community is different, however it is expected that the development of these Locality Plans would occur alongside communities. As an example to date, the Eastside community has developed a Wellness Plan and contributed to the Structure Plan for the area. It is expected that the way of working with the Eastside community would help inform how we begin working with the other communities as housing developments in these other areas progress. Community service hubs are one way in which communities may be better served. The concept is that communities identify the range of services they would like closer to home. For example this might include WINZ support, health services, library services etc. It is very specific to each community but essentially brings together some services/activities that are a priority for the community. These are not limited to Council services.

    Details of these Locality Plans are yet to be determined. In the short term, the Ngongotaha community can apply for a Partnership Agreement with Rotorua Lakes Council for financial support to facilitate community initiatives. The next round of applications will open in the next couple of months. More information about Partnership Agreements can be found here

    Nga mihi

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    I note the document is titled "Mahi", however there has been a serious lack of consultation with affected parties living adjacent to the modifications made for the 'trial' (undoubtedly permanent) to Larcy Rd. An unsupervised 'crossing' has been positioned outside 18 and 11A Larcy Rd (speed calming measures will be added) yet no personal consultation with these affected residents has occurred. A manned 'crossing' is adjacent to the school further along Larcy Rd. 1 The modifications are primarily to manage school drop of / pick up and pupils walking and cycling to school ie approx 1 hr/day, 40 weeks/year yet we (11A, 18) will have to live with the slowing down, speeding up noise and vibration through the ground, of vehicles 24/7, 365 days/yr. Yes, vehicles do use this road at night and yes, trucks use it day and night. The main bedroom of both residences face the road. 2 A shared path is to be constructed along the odd numbered side of Larcy Rd in the very near future so why are people, primarily school children, being taught / encouraged to cross Larcy Rd at what seems to be a fairly 'permanent' position to what will be the 'wrong' side of the road now? Why not have stuck to the status quo for a short time longer given there is now a supervised crossing point at the school end of what will be the shared path....unless a complete re-education plan is to be made by the school in the near future which seems a waste of valuable teaching time. Alternatively, does Council want most of the costly shared path to remain pristine and unused? Was the future use of the shared path vs the continued use of the existing footpath factored into the plans? 3 Who is expected to care for the planter boxes? In summer these are going to dry out and neither affected residents have hoses long enough to reach them, much less have the inclination to manage something we can't endorse.

    Paddi50 asked 7 months ago

    Thanks for all the questions.

    These questions you raise regarding Te Manawa ō Owhatuira trial project are outside of the topics being consulted on currently within the 2021-2031 Long-term Plan consultation.

    However, we will forward your concerns to the project team and someone will be in touch shortly.

    Nga mihi nui

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    A  recent press release from the Maori Party highlighted the physical and psychological suffering of the Hapu of Hurungaterangi Marae in Ngapuna by faulty sewerage plant infrastructure. According to Waititi, “The sewerage pump at the plant was broken and the pipes are too old causing leaks everywhere.” “The smell is foul and is making the people physically sick. Their sewage systems are exploding and wastewater is being discharged into the Puarenga stream; their ancestral waters. Also, in heavy rain, the incompetent sewerage system means that sewerage overflows onto their properties. This has happened despite previous patch up jobs” Waititi understood that the Council is of the belief that the issues have been resolved. However, Waititi suggests that Hapū would disagree. In fact, from my research, concerns from Hapū over this issue have stretched back decades and have largely been ignored. This has resulted in residential ancestral lands and marae coming increasingly under threat in an area now dominated by industry. The questions I have therefore are: Where does this LTP reflect genuine engagement between Council and mana whenua groups in the Ngapuna area over the short and long term plans related to the waste management plant, its location, infrastructure, methods and sites of discharge and storm water management? Where in this LTP has Council demonstrated consideration of the recommendations made in the 2017 Cultural Impacts Assessment prepared for Council by Te Onewa Consultants and with specific respect to sections 5.6 Historic Planning Decisions and 5.7 Cultural Preferences? Where does the Council demonstrate their commitment to Te Tiriti in the development and consultation processes of this LTP? I look forward to your response.

    Karena asked 7 months ago

    Kia ora - Thank you for your questions on Council’s 2021-2031 Long-Term Plan consultation. We have provided responses to these as follows. 

     Where does this LTP reflect genuine engagement between Council and mana whenua groups in the Ngapuna area over the short and long term plans related to the waste management plant, its location, infrastructure, methods and sites of discharge and storm water management?
     
    The Long-Term Plan (LTP) sets out what Council is proposing to achieve over the next ten years and how that will be funded. The LTP addresses district-wide concerns, it is not the vehicle for direct engagement with mana whenua on individual kaupapa or projects.

    As noted on page five of the LTP consultation document, there will be a dedicated engagement process early next year to discuss the Sustainable Forest Approach which looks at the future discharge of recovered (treated) wastewater. On page five there is also information about a separate engagement process to consider stormwater management (Three Waters Reform), and Council is also currently in early discussions with CNI and mana whenua about an alternative wetland proposal in the forest.

    Where does the Council demonstrate their commitment to Te Tiriti in the development and consultation processes of this LTP?  

    Te Tatau o Te Arawa (along with elected members of Council and the two community boards) were invited to all workshops to discuss and develop key themes in the LTP. Te Tatau also have two voting members on the Strategy, Policy and Funding Committee (which approved the draft LTP for consultation, and which will vote on whether to accept the LTP before it goes to Council).

    About 40% of the district’s population is Māori, most of whom are Te Arawa. Every aspect of the LTP affects Te Arawa people both as members of the general public and as mana whenua. As you can see across all of the LTP strategies and proposals, Council seeks to provide for the wellbeing of Te Arawa communities in everything we do. 

    The engagement process includes a broad and open community hui process, including a hui at Ōhinemutu and another at Te Takinga marae. 

    In response to your concerns about the Hona Road wastewater pump station and Rotorua’s wastewater treatment plant:

    The recent issues at the wastewater pump station on Hona Road were not due to a sewage leak. Last month, an alarm went off which alerted TRILITY crews to an issue at the pump station that services the Eastern part of the city. Silt and rubble from a damaged pipe near the station caused continual blockages in the main, resulting in a build-up of wastewater.

    TRILITY responded to the issue before an overflow occurred and worked around the clock with mobile pumps and sucker trucks to reduce the level of wastewater within the pump station and network.

    There was no overflow/spill. Allegations of a sewage leak into the Puarenga, on to private properties, or any other properties, is not correct.

    You can read more about how this issue was responded to on Council’s website HERE

    Rotorua’s wastewater treatment plant sits on land gifted by Ngati Whakaue for the establishment of the township. The site has been used for sewerage purposes since 1891, and the current treatment plant was established in 1973, with several major upgrades since then. 

    Some hapū members have from time to time asked that we move the wastewater treatment plant from its current site. We acknowledge their concern and continuously look for ways to improve our systems to minimise and avoid any impact on neighbours. For example, in response to the significant concerns of Ngāpuna hapu, Council has withdrawn its application to discharge recovered (treated) wastewater to Te Arikiroa and Sulphur Bay and is developing an alternative discharge proposal on a different site.

    Council acknowledges that Ngāpuna is an important traditional kāinga for Ngāpuna hapū, that has become surrounded by industrial activity. In the 2018 spatial plan, Rotorua Lakes Council identified the need to open up industrial land in other areas and encourage industrial uses to shift away from Ngāpuna. Rotorua Lakes Council is working on the supply of new industrial land (away from Ngāpuna) to enable this (as discussed in the LTP). 

    Where in this LTP has Council demonstrated consideration of the recommendations made in the 2017 Cultural Impacts Assessment prepared for Council by Te Onewa Consultants and with specific respect to sections 5.6 Historic Planning Decisions and 5.7 Cultural Preferences? 

    As noted above, the impact of those historic planning decisions (chapter 5.6) was identified in the Spatial Plan, which supports the intention to address the issue of industrial activities near a traditional village. More recently, Council has been working in partnership with Eastside hapū and the Tatau Pounamu Collective on the ‘Eastside Community Wellness Plan’. This Plan provides a framework for future development and growth within Eastside Rotorua, this framework reflecting the vision for the future of Eastside and the dreams and aspirations of those who live in this area to support a well-planned, connected and thriving community. This Plan recognises that the village of Ngāpuna has significant cultural, geothermal and historic values, similar to Whakarewarewa and Ohinemutu. Some of the future actions are to investigate long-term land use options and opportunities for current industrial land and businesses in Ngāpuna.
    Cultural preferences (chapter 5.7) supported significant upgrade of the current Rotorua Wastewater Treatment Plant. That work is already underway. 

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    Where in the Consultation documents is reference to Council's continued funding of grants to community groups and organisations - like the Community Grants, Partnership grants etc

    Citizens78 asked 7 months ago

    Thanks for the question.
    We have not included any narrative around grants to the community groups etc. We have not added or reduced any of the grants at this stage to the LTP. But you may choose to provide feedback on this for Elected Members to consider.
    The Consultation Document is like a prospectus or manifesto for a council, setting out what the council plans to do in the coming years. It outlines the key challenges a council believes it will need to address over the coming 10 year period, and identifies options being considered to meet those challenges - and the cost of implementing those options. It effectively initiates a public conversation to generate community feedback, which is taken into account when preparing the LTP.

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    Can you please explain the definition of '3 waters' mentioned in the plan?

    Kathryn asked 7 months ago

    Thanks for the questions - easy!

    The 'Three Waters' referred to are as follows: drinking water, wastewater and stormwater.

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    Why has the council done to publicise that feedback is being sought? If people don't get newspapers or follow online media how are they supposed to know about this? You should have sent a flyer to every home to make sure everyone affected was aware.

    Kathryn asked 8 months ago

    Thanks for asking - Because we know that people get their news and information in different ways and from different sources, Council uses many different ways to advertise when it is seeking feedback. We attempt to cover as many ways and places as we can. The call for feedback on Council’s proposed Long-term Plan has been on the RLC website, across social media channels, on local radio stations, advertised on the back of City Ride buses, on School Apps NZ, in community newsletters, in the Rotorua Airport magazine and in Council’s most recent quarterly magazine Tatau Tatau which is delivered to letter boxes in the district(all addresses that are registered with NZ Post) and is distributed to some of the city’s GP clinics, retailers, pharmacies, community organisations (eg Mokoia, SPCA, Age Concern). There is also a displays in the Rotorua Library, Airport, Trade Central shopping centre, Aquatic centre and storyboards at the aquatic centre. Council staff have been at a number of community events to share information and encourage people to give feedback.

    You can also register to this platform to stay updated on current engagements and receive our weekly e-panui.

    Thanks!

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    What is the communication center being built on the lakefront for and why is it needed? How much will it cost to build and to maintain? Is it a separate building from the cafe? Is the proposed cafe on the lakefront up for public consultation or has council decided to put it there no matter what ratepayers think? What is the total cost of the cafe? Is council intending to open and run the cafe business? Where is the business plan? When will it become profitable? Is the $7million Information center in the redwoods still going ahead? Is the airport industrial park going ahead without it having gone out for public consultation first? Why is RLC planning to spend more in the airport when we were told it will become economic after the new arrival and departure lounges were built? What is the total cost of the industrial park? Are ratepayers funding the total amount? Where is the business plan? What more is being built and how much more spending is proposed for MTBing? How many kms of old sewage pipes are being replaced annually for the next ten years? Where is the renewal plan for the replacement of sewage pipe? How many kms of old storm water pipes are being replaced annuallly for the next ten years and which streets will get the upgraded storm water pipes? How much is that costing ratepayers annually? What are the costs and fees homeowners currently pay to add on bedroom and what will they increase to if user pays is adopted? What do dog owners pay and what will they pay if user pays is adopted? What do families pay to use the aquatic center and what will they pay if user pays is adopted? What can RLC do to cut their fees and charges and rates and reduce waste spending and improve efficiency of the business instead of burdening ratepayers the majority of who live on low incomes or are in poverty, with more fees and charges and rate increases people can no longer afford?

    pghosking asked 8 months ago

    Thanks for the questions and sorry for the delay in reply.

    It has taken a little time to reach out to the various teams in Council to gain answers to your questions. I have grouped these answers as per the groupings of your questions. Thanks!

    Lakefront - What is the communication center being built on the lakefront for and why is it needed? How much will it cost to build and to maintain? Is it a separate building from the cafe? Is the proposed cafe on the lakefront up for public consultation or has council decided to put it there no matter what ratepayers think? What is the total cost of the cafe? Is council intending to open and run the cafe business? Where is the business plan? When will it become profitable?

    The lakefront masterplan and landscape design allows an area for a commercial building. We assume this is what is meant by “communication centre”.  This building would contain lakefront tourism operators and also food and beverage operators. These would be private businesses and there are no plans for Council to operate a café at the lakefront. The purpose of having these businesses in a new building in this area is to add to the amenity and recreation value of the lakefront and to provide for economic development opportunities. 

    The detailed design and construction of the commercial building is not funded through the lakefront project as the intention is for this to be built and maintained by private investors. However it may be necessary for Council to be a part investor, particularly at the first stages to facilitate the development. On this basis $2m has been allowed for within the recovery/economic development projects budget in case this is required. A commercial building including food and beverage was in the lakefront plans engaged on previously as part of the 2018 LTP.

    Whakarewarewa Forest - Is the $7million Information center in the redwoods still going ahead? What more is being built and how much more spending is proposed for MTBing?

    Yes, the Titokorangi Visitor centre is still planned to go ahead (the allocated budget is $3.5 million) but there is still work to do with CNI on the scope and design for the building. The Te Pūtake o Tawa car parking area and toilet block has been completed and there is still some art works being made for this site. The Whakarewarewa Forest Loop trail is also nearly complete.

    There will still be ongoing annual investment into biking, walking and horse trails in the forest to maintain the network and work with land owners on any new trails needed. This spending is strongly supplemented by fund raising and sponsorship from businesses to allow the Rotorua Trails Trust to maintain great forest experiences for locals and visitors. 

    Airport - Is the airport industrial park going ahead without it having gone out for public consultation first? Why is RLC planning to spend more in the airport when we were told it will become economic after the new arrival and departure lounges were built? What is the total cost of the industrial park? Are ratepayers funding the total amount? Where is the business plan?

    Council adopted a Build Back Strategy alongside the Annual Plan 2020/21 in direct response to COVID-19.   Within that, an economic recovery fund of $29million was set aside and consulted on.  $9million was set aside in the  2020/21 budget and $20million is signalled in the 2021/22 budget.  

    The amount outlined in the consultation document of $4million towards the airport industrial park is a provisional sum and highlights how the funding maybe allocated across a number of projects that demonstrate contributions towards Rotorua’s ability to build back  better economically  following COVID-19.

    The Airport Company have reported to the Operations and Monitoring Committee on numerous occasions on their master plan proposal of which the Industrial Park is a part of.  Funding will not granted until the Airport Company have completed a detailed business plan. This is under development currently.

    Infrastructure Strategy - How many kms of old sewage pipes are being replaced annually for the next ten years? Where is the renewal plan for the replacement of sewage pipe? How many kms of old storm water pipes are being replaced annuallly for the next ten years and which streets will get the upgraded storm water pipes? How much is that costing ratepayers annually? 

    The answers to all these questions sit in the 30 Year Infrastructure Strategy that can be found HERE and the 10 Year Capital Expenditure Programme that can be found HERE.

    Financial Strategy, Fees & Changes and UAGCWhat are the costs and fees homeowners currently pay to add on bedroom and what will they increase to if user pays is adopted? What do dog owners pay and what will they pay if user pays is adopted? What do families pay to use the aquatic center and what will they pay if user pays is adopted? What can RLC do to cut their fees and charges and rates and reduce waste spending and improve efficiency of the business instead of burdening ratepayers the majority of who live on low incomes or are in poverty, with more fees and charges and rate increases people can no longer afford? 

    This is in the Draft Fees and Charges Schedule that can be found HERE as supporting documentation on the website. As per the LTP Consultation Document if fees and charges do not increase (which they haven’t done in three years) then the funding gap will have to be covered by general rates. So either the user pays or rate payers wear the additional cost. The consultation question asks which our people prefer in the LTP Consultation.

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    On page 9 of the consultation document under 'Increasing Role of Council', 'Light partnering', you use the term 'front load construction of infrastructure' . What does this term 'front load' actually mean in this context? It is not clear.

    Kathryn asked 8 months ago

    Great question!!

    In a ‘normal’ development the developer would create a plan (eg. For a subdivision), have that approved/consented, build all the required infrastructure (e.g. Stormwater requirements, water and waste water connections and roads) and then once completed the infrastructure is often handed to Council to manage/maintain. The term “front loading” (using an example of a subdivision) would see Council working with a developer in the planning stages around the infrastructure requirements leading into and within the subdivision area. Council may then pay for and construct the required infrastructure. A pay-back scheme would then be put in place for council  to recover its contribution as sections are sold. This could be through a targeted rates. This ‘light partnering’ is a way of reducing the up-front capital costs and could be a mechanism to assist in accelerating development.

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    Could you please upload into the supporting documents the proposed Rates funding impact statement.

    JamesS asked 8 months ago

    The Rates Funding Impact Statement is prepared as apart of the Final Draft of the Long-term Plan. We are not required to prepare this to go out for public consultation. We are required to prepare a Consultation Document and have the required 'Supporting Information' prepared that support this document. All this information needs to pass an audit requirement before Council can adopt a Consultation Document and begin public consultation.
    All the supporting information can be found on this web page HERE on the right hand side. Thanks

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    What is the best method to submit a detailed written submission for the Draft Long Term Plan?

    Itchy asked 8 months ago

    Kia ora,

    Great question! The answer is yes and the following is how to.

    Couple of options:

    1. You can use our online feedback form and add your detailed written feedback as an attachment. Fill in your contact details on the first page. (that will allow us to easily get your contact information e.g. Name, email, etc) and then skip to the last page where the attachment upload function is.
    2. You can email written feedback to letstalk@rotorualc.nz 

    Consultation will run until 4pm on Friday 30 April 2021.

    Thanks for the question and look forward to hearing from you soon!

Page last updated: 28 June 2021, 16:30